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The Men’s Probus Club of Skegness founded 1974
Speakers: February to June February 13th Neil Watson: Boston Now and Then Neil introduced himself and gave a brief outline of his interests. His   presentation   started   with   a   restoration   project   of   a   family   photo   album   dating   from 1891.   Some   of   the   photos   were   faded   but,   with   the   help   of   modern   digital   technology, they   were   able   to   be   restored.   The   villages   of   Kirton   and   Skegness   were   part   of   this album   and   Boston   in   particular   was   shown   in   the   1890s   as   a   busy   market   town   with photographs   of   Boston   cattle   market   and   also   showing   that   Boston   harbour   was navigable to very large cargo ships. He   then   moved   to   a   slide   show   of   some   ‘magic   lantern’   slides   taken   in   the   1890s   (these   were   much more   difficult   to   restore)   showing   the   industry   of   Boston   at   the   time.   One   of   the   slides   was   of   Boston Grammar   School   which   he   compared   to   a   recent   photograph   taken   120   years   later   showing   how   little the main building has changed. This   year   is   the   50th   year   of   the   closing   of   the   railway   line   in Boston    and    he    has    been    commissioned    to    put    together    an exhibition   about   Boston   railway.   This   part   of   the   talk   centred   on the    Hall    Hill    Sleeper    Works    and    how    they    processed    sleeper timbers that came from as far away as Canada. The   Rundle   family   has   supplied   him   with   photographs   of   their family   connections   in   Boston.   They   owned   fairground   rides,   farm machinery, steam rollers etc. The   talk   was   rounded   off   by   showing   a   short   film   taking   in   the 1963   big   freeze   and   how   the   railways   had   to   deal   with   the   amount of   snowfall   blocking   the   tracks.      He   also   had   aerial      photographic contributions   from   a   member   of   Skegness   Mens   probus   that   he was in the process of restoring.                                        John Boreham gave a vote of thanks February 27th Neil Watson: The History of Boston Theatres and Cinemas The President welcomed 31 members. Having   stepped   in   at   the   last   minute   for   the   previous   meeting   and   presented   his scheduled   talk,   Neil   chose      this   time   to   give   an   illustrated   talk   about   Boston   Theatres and    Cinemas,    an    interesting    historical    talk    that    showed    the    many    places    of entertainment   that   have   existed   in   Boston   over   the   past   200   years.   most   of   which   are now used for other purposes or have been pulled down and replaced. The President, John Boreham, gave a vote of thanks March 13th John Hayes: Another lot of balls and a Panama hat Twenty     six     members     attended     the meeting. John    gave        a    very    entertaining    talk regarding   his   cricket   experiences,   both as a player but mainly as an umpire. A   very   accomplished   speaker   wirth   a relaxed    style    and    a    host    of    amusing anecdotes much enjoyed by all present. John Boreham gave a vote of thanks March 27th Doctor Eric Grigg:  Anglo-Saxon and Viking Lincolnshire When   the   Romans   retreated   back   to   Rome   what   happened   in   Lincoln   was   that   all the   infrastructure   remained   but   were   left   to   fall   into   disrepair   and   the Anglo-Saxons mainly   used   the   stones   and   timber   for   their   own   buildings   as   no   quarrying   took place. The   kingdom   of   Lindsey    was   set   up   by   the   Angles    but   not   a   lot   of   information   is available   for   this   period. All   we   know   is   there   is   a   list   of   Kings   but   none   of   these   were   able   to   be   verified. The   boundary   of   Lindsey   ran   from   the   North   Sea   to   the   River   Trent   via   the   Humber   estuary   and   then   to the   River   Witham .   A   number   of   slides   were   shown   of   Anglo-Saxon   armour.   Pieces   of   armour   were recovered   from   the   site   at   Caenby   indicating   that   a   king   may have been buried there. In   679   the   Battle   of   the   Trent    was   fought   between   Mercia and   Northumberland   with   Lindsey   becoming   part   of   Mercia. Slides    were    shown    of    monasteries    and    churches    on    the surrounding area during this time. The   Vikings   arrived   who   pushed   the   Anglo-Saxons   out   of Mercia.   The   Vikings   divided   up   Lincolnshire   and   settled   in Lincoln   a   vital   spot   for   trading   as   the   river   enabled   them   to use   their   ships.   They   even   minted   their   own   coins   and   we know   they   traded      as   far   afield   as   Afghanistan   as   amber   was also   recovered   at   the   site   from   the   Baltic.      Lincoln   was   not   ruled   as   a   kingdom   but   as   an   autonomous self-governing   body. A   Viking   ice   skate    was   also   shown   to   the   members   made   out   of   cow   bone.   40%   of the place names from Lincolnshire in the Doomsday Book are of Viking origin.                                        John Boreham gave a vote of thanks 10th April Graeme Thompson: Borehole in Ghana Graeme   gave   an   account   of   his   work   in   2018   when   he   was   involved   in   drilling   a bore   hole   for   fresh   water   to   a   village   called   Karufa   in   the   shanty   region   of   Ghana.     The   village   is   near   to Akra.      Funds   for   this   project   were   raised   by   the   congregation of   Addlethorpe   Methodist   church   that   had   to   close   due   to   structural   problems   and the   funds   in   the   account   were   passed   over   to   be   used   for   this   purpose.   Karufa   was chosen   as   the   place   for   the   bore   hole   to be   drilled   for   fresh   water   and   this   went down   for   50m   before   any   fresh   water   was   found.      This   has transformed   the   lives   of   the   village   and   particularly   benefitted the 430 pupils at the local school.  Much   of   the   village   relies   on   charitable   donations   and   much of   the   school,   toilets   etc   are   in   urgent   need   of   repair   and   it was    stressed    there    is    a    need    to    raise    £5000    so    that    by September   this   year   a   return   visit   can   be   made   to   replace the toilets. .                                        John Boreham gave a vote of thanks
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During the Business Meeting The President conferred Honorary Life Membership on two members, Ivor Davis (left) and Bill Reid